There are many chews on the market today that can be considered safer for dogs because they are digestible and not too hard for teeth. It is important to remember that even large chunks from digestible chews can still cause GI upset or blockage. Always supervise your dog after giving it chews. If the dog seems to be swallowing large chunks, take the chew away. Furthermore, if the dog develops vomiting, diarrhea, or other signs of illness, see your vet right away.
A dog’s deciduous teeth will erupt between three to eight weeks of age and around four to six months of age these teeth will be gradually replaced with permanent teeth. Teething is a painful process and puppies chew more during this period of time because their gums are very irritated during this time and the act of chewing relieves their discomfort. Inappropriate chewing is most likely to occur while the puppy is teething but if not corrected can become a long standing problem even after all the adult teeth emerge and teething ends.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE VETERINARY ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your pet’s health. Never ignore professional veterinary advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think your pet may have a veterinary emergency, immediately call your veterinarian.

You don’t mention TUFFIES CHEW PROOF beds. I have had mine for more than 4 years now. I have replaced one cover not due to chewing but to digging. Replacement covers are cheap and easy to fit. And they come with a guarantee! My dogs love them and haven’t chewed them at all – because there is nothing they can chew. The beds are waterproof, warm, have a nice wide rim to rest the head on and have very thick duvet-style material in the base. They wash with the hose or with soapy water and dry very quickly since they are waterproof.
Some chews and toys can provide additional benefits for your dog; like mental stimulation or help with keeping their teeth clean. However, it's also true that chew toys have the potential to cause problems. Always closely observe your dog the first few times they’re playing with a new chew toy or eating a new type of chew. And, even in the long-term, keep watch and if you’re at all worried about a particular toy, don’t leave your dog alone with it, or just take it away and try another.

If your dog gets upset when you leave, teach her that you'll always come back. At first, leave her alone for just 5 or 10 minutes. Stay away a little longer each time. Give her a chew toy and leave on the radio or TV. Be calm when you go and return so she knows that being alone is OK. Crate training can prevent this problem with some dogs. But it might not work with an anxious older dog. Ask your vet for advice.
Janice M. writes, “My yellow Labrador Retriever pup is about 5 months old. Anytime I try to reward/pet him on the head or scratch behind his ears, he turns his head to chew on my hand. He does this with my husband and our 5-year-old. Our 5-year-old doesn’t like to pet him because of the puppy’s chewing. Why is he doing this? He has plenty of toys and chews in the house and yard.”
Dogs who are prevented from engaging in exciting activities sometimes direct biting, shaking, tearing and chewing at nearby objects. Shelter dogs and puppies sometimes grab and shake blankets or bowls in their kennels whenever people walk by because they’d like attention. When they don’t get it, their frustration is expressed through destructive behavior. A dog who sees a squirrel or cat run by and wants to chase but is behind a fence might grab and chew at the gate. A dog watching another dog in a training class might become so excited by the sight of his canine classmate having fun that he grabs and chews his leash. (Agility and Flyball dogs are especially prone to this behavior because they watch other dogs racing around and having a great time, and they want to join in the action.) The best intervention for this problem is to anticipate when frustration might happen and give your dog an appropriate toy for shaking and tearing. In a class situation, carry a tug or stuffed toy for your dog to hold and chew. If your dog is frustrated by animals or objects on the other side of a fence or gate at home, tie a rope toy to something sturdy by the gate or barrier. Provide shelter dogs and puppies with toys and chew bones in their kennels. Whenever possible, teach them to approach the front of their kennels and sit quietly to solicit attention from passersby.
My dog constantly chews and licks her paws. She has done this for several years. She also throws up at least once a week. Sometimes it’s the undigested food, other times it’s yellow color. Three times it has been blood. The vet thinks it’s food allergies, so I changed her food two weeks ago and she is still throwing up. Her WBC is always low too when we do blood work. What else could be the cause?
This Qwizl treat toy won the Best New Product award at the 2017 Global Pet Expo. Its manufacturer, West Paw, is B-Corp certified, which recognizes "companies all over the world that are creating exceptional positive social and environmental impact." Their proprietary Zogoflex® material is completely recyclable and free from latex, BPA, and phthalate. It's ideal for inserting treats, even bully sticks, which makes it take longer for your dog to finish the treat. Extra bonus for the Qwizl: it's dishwasher safe!  
Dogs really like to dig. You'll have to train Fido to get him to stop. When you catch him in the act say "no." Then distract him with a toy. It won’t help to scold him after he's done. You need to be consistent when he’s digging, not afterward. Tip: Give him a sandbox where he can go to town. Bury some favorite toys and watch him have fun getting them out. Pile on the praise -- it will help him learn that he can dig all day in that spot.
Always praise your dog when she comes to you, whether you called or not. That teaches her that coming to you is good. Say "come" or "here." She may not understand what you want if you just call her name. If she doesn't come, don't chase her. Call her again while you move away. That might make her come after you. If she still doesn't show up, tell her to sit, and go get her.
Chewing is a natural behavior for dogs. They use their mouths to explore the environment in the same way that humans use their hands as investigative tools. Irksome and sometimes expensive destructive chewing usually takes place when the owner is not with the dog. Therefore, correction when the dog starts or is in the act is impossible. The chewing can then become a compulsive behavior when the dog is lonely, bored, stressed or anxious.
I’ve been known to put my foot in my mouth. But dogs do it on purpose. So, why do dogs chew their feet? The answer isn’t as straightforward as you might think. Sure, there’s a simple explanation for the behavior. “A dog is essentially trying to scratch the itch,” says Christopher Pachel, DVM, owner of the Animal Behavior Clinic in Portland, Oregon. But finding the cause of foot chewing can be complicated. “It can be multiple different things,” Dr. Pachel says. “This is not one size fits all.”
Boredom, anxiety, frustration, or excess energy may be common triggers. Some dogs suffer from separation anxiety and once left alone at home will resort to chewing half a house apart. If you recognize any of these behavior issues try to address them properly. A dog behaviorist may be necessary for severe cases. However, many times all it takes is taking your dog out more to release the extra energy and help relieve the boredome. This is usally the path towards happier and more relaxed dog.
Boredom, anxiety, frustration, or excess energy may be common triggers. Some dogs suffer from separation anxiety and once left alone at home will resort to chewing half a house apart. If you recognize any of these behavior issues try to address them properly. A dog behaviorist may be necessary for severe cases. However, many times all it takes is taking your dog out more to release the extra energy and help relieve the boredome. This is usally the path towards happier and more relaxed dog.
Virbac C.E.T. Enzymatic Oral Hygiene Chews contain no artificial coloring and are made from carefully selected hides. These chews also include a powerful and beneficial enzyme called glucose oxidase, which helps protect your dog's teeth by breaking down the sugars that disease-causing bacteria feed on. You can buy them online or get them from your veterinarian.
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It’s natural for a dog to greet people by jumping up. But that can scare away guests. Turn away if your dog jumps on you. Don't give your dog attention unless he has his front paws on the ground. Then you can greet him and pet him. Or tell him to sit and wait until he does before you pet him. Try to keep your greetings low-key. That helps your dog learn to control his own excitement. Make sure he doesn’t bother or scare people who aren't used to him.

Boredom, anxiety, frustration, or excess energy may be common triggers. Some dogs suffer from separation anxiety and once left alone at home will resort to chewing half a house apart. If you recognize any of these behavior issues try to address them properly. A dog behaviorist may be necessary for severe cases. However, many times all it takes is taking your dog out more to release the extra energy and help relieve the boredome. This is usally the path towards happier and more relaxed dog.
The desire to investigate interesting objects and the discomfort of teething motivate puppies to chew. Much like human infants, puppies go through a stage when they lose their baby teeth and experience pain as their adult teeth come in. This intensified chewing phase usually ends by six months of age. Some recommend giving puppies ice cubes, special dog toys that can be frozen or frozen wet washcloths to chew, which might help numb teething pain. Although puppies do need to chew on things, gentle guidance can teach your puppy to restrict chewing to appropriate objects, like his own toys.
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