Your dog may be a big chewer necessitating stronger chew toys. Invest in some “heavy duty” chew toys such as Nylabones or pretty durable rubber toys. Try to stay away from rawhide bones that may cause choking and even intestinal obstructions. Stay away as well from squeaky toys as many dogs have gone through the toy and ingested the squeaker requiring major surgery. Kongs are very durable and great as they may be stuffed with peanut butter or other goodies. They may also be frozen to relieve puppy’s teething pain. If you are not supplying the right chew toys that meets your dog’s chewing requirements he/she may easily find your furniture much more appealing. Try to make the toys more atrractive by routinely alternating them to prevent boredom.
In addition to getting some chew toys for puppies, consider puppy-proofing your home. It will minimize the damage to your house while you’re training your puppy, and prevent them from getting hurt. Keep a close watch on your puppy or problem adult dog by using Petcube, a pet camera that will broadcast your voice from a remote location. It’s a good way to let your dog know that you’re watching, even when you’re not in the room.
It’s also possible that your puppy’s ears are sensitive and he may not be comfortable with that type of touching. It’s important to pay attention to his body language to see what he is telling you. If you think sensitivity is the reason for this behavior, take him to your veterinarian to have his ears checked for signs of infection. If excitement over your attention is causing your puppy to mouth and bite your hands, be sure to provide enrichment and play through food puzzle toys, training, exercise, and games with toys.
My dog has been biting his foot for a couple years now. We used to treat it by giving him half of a children's Benadryl pill (vet recommended) but we stopped awhile back when it seemed to stop. Recently he's been biting his foot again but now it's all the time and he softly whines the whole time he's doing it. I think it's time we get him checked out, thoughts?
There are many chews on the market today that can be considered safer for dogs because they are digestible and not too hard for teeth. It is important to remember that even large chunks from digestible chews can still cause GI upset or blockage. Always supervise your dog after giving it chews. If the dog seems to be swallowing large chunks, take the chew away. Furthermore, if the dog develops vomiting, diarrhea, or other signs of illness, see your vet right away.
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