My dog chews and licks at her paws constantly. They are turning red in between each of her paws. She’s been shaking her head continuously even after we recently took her to the vet and got treated for an “ear infection”. She goes through phases where she sneezes nonstop. I dont know what’s wrong and I looked it up her symptoms and it appears it may be a problem due to foxtails getting lodged into her body. I don’t know what to do, surgery is going to be expensive but I hate seeing her suffer.
Some dogs bark at things others ignore. Some bark when they're frustrated. Don't yell at your dog when she barks. That could make it worse. Obedience training can help fix frustration barking. If your dog learns to sit before she does something fun like going for a walk, she’ll learn to control her impulses. If she’s outside all day, bringing her inside for a couple of hours could help. But you may need to work with a vet or a trainer.
Every new puppy or dog owner should expect a certain amount of destruction from curiosity-based or tension-relieving oral tendencies of the pet. The solution to the problem lies in removing the environmental cause and guiding the dog towards the appropriate objects to chew. The above-mentioned preventive and corrective approaches will help to minimize and ultimately solve the problem while allowing the dog to develop a healthy relationship with you.
To cut the barking, teach your dog a new habit. Pick a spot within sight of the door. Then teach her to lie down and stay when you say, "Go to your spot." That will help her stay calm and give her something to do while she waits to be greeted. Have a friend with a treat come to the door, but only open it when your dog is quiet. Do this enough and she’ll learn to chill out if she wants that treat.
Patience and consistency are the key factors leading to success. You need to ensure that each and every time your dog heads for your wood coffee table you correct him promptly and hand him a chew toy. This may be pretty annoying at first, but gradually you should notice the attempts tapering off. It is vital that you and your family members are all on the same track, ensuring that everyone will correct in the same correct matter. All it takes is a couple of episodes that are not corrected promptly to positively reinforce the behavior and return. If you are unable to watch your dog it would be in your best interest if you would crate him until you can trust him alone. Remember: corrections must occur within 5 seconds in order to be fully effective. Dogs do not have the same attention spans as humans do. If it takes longer than 5 seconds your dog may no longer know what he did wrong and will not be able to associate the correction with the wood chewing.
If your dog gets upset when you leave, teach her that you'll always come back. At first, leave her alone for just 5 or 10 minutes. Stay away a little longer each time. Give her a chew toy and leave on the radio or TV. Be calm when you go and return so she knows that being alone is OK. Crate training can prevent this problem with some dogs. But it might not work with an anxious older dog. Ask your vet for advice.
Remember that there is no one chew that is right for every dog. For overweight dogs or those with sensitive stomachs, it may be best to stick with non-edible chew toys. For healthy but selective dogs, you might need to try a few different types of chews before you discover what works best for your dog. Overall healthy and non-discerning dogs will probably enjoy a little bit of everything. Just make sure no treat or chew makes up more than about 10 percent of your dog's diet.
Always praise your dog when she comes to you, whether you called or not. That teaches her that coming to you is good. Say "come" or "here." She may not understand what you want if you just call her name. If she doesn't come, don't chase her. Call her again while you move away. That might make her come after you. If she still doesn't show up, tell her to sit, and go get her.
One of the common answers to, “Why do dogs chew their feet?” Allergies. If the behavior coincides with a change of seasons, that offers a clue that an environmental allergen, such as pollen, mold or mildew, might be triggering the behavior. More long-term chewing could signal a food allergy. But determining the exact food ingredient is difficult and time consuming. “It is a process of trial and error, and it’s impossible to predict just by looking at the dog just what they are allergic to,” Dr. Pachel says.

Your dog may be a big chewer necessitating stronger chew toys. Invest in some “heavy duty” chew toys such as Nylabones or pretty durable rubber toys. Try to stay away from rawhide bones that may cause choking and even intestinal obstructions. Stay away as well from squeaky toys as many dogs have gone through the toy and ingested the squeaker requiring major surgery. Kongs are very durable and great as they may be stuffed with peanut butter or other goodies. They may also be frozen to relieve puppy’s teething pain. If you are not supplying the right chew toys that meets your dog’s chewing requirements he/she may easily find your furniture much more appealing. Try to make the toys more atrractive by routinely alternating them to prevent boredom.
The desire to investigate interesting objects and the discomfort of teething motivate puppies to chew. Much like human infants, puppies go through a stage when they lose their baby teeth and experience pain as their adult teeth come in. This intensified chewing phase usually ends by six months of age. Some recommend giving puppies ice cubes, special dog toys that can be frozen or frozen wet washcloths to chew, which might help numb teething pain. Although puppies do need to chew on things, gentle guidance can teach your puppy to restrict chewing to appropriate objects, like his own toys.

“It really comes back to why it’s happening,” Dr. Pachel says. “For any one of these issues, there might be multiple treatment options. Focusing on basic health care is a great start to at least minimizing some of these other issues. Then it’s a matter of watching your dog carefully and making that educated decision about when to have him evaluated by a veterinarian.”

Puppy chewing is often caused by the fact that either their baby teeth are erupting, or they are being replaced by permanent teeth. The tiny, needle-like teeth erupt when your pooch is around 3 to 8 weeks old, and just when you get used to scratches from nipping, they start teething again. Dogs stop teething when they are around 4 to 6 months old when all of their milk teeth are replaced by adult ones.


CHEW Dog Rescue is an all-volunteer organization dedicated to rescuing abandoned dogs, dogs scheduled for euthanasia due to shelter space limitations, and other dogs who need us. We are always looking to find additional foster homes and acquire funding for veterinary care and other essential elements of dog rescue to allow us to help more dogs in need. CHEW (Canine Health Education and Welfare) is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization.
A longtime favorite among many dog owners, Kong toys are known for their durability and come in different "strengths" and sizes. The Classic Kong (featured in the photo above) can also be filled with dry or canned/wet food. (Check out some of the other "stuffing" recipe ideas on the Kong website.) You can even freeze the toys with the stuffing inside in order to extend your dog's play time as they try to scoop out every last bit — plus freezing Kongs can help soothe the pain for a teething puppy.
Some dogs bark at things others ignore. Some bark when they're frustrated. Don't yell at your dog when she barks. That could make it worse. Obedience training can help fix frustration barking. If your dog learns to sit before she does something fun like going for a walk, she’ll learn to control her impulses. If she’s outside all day, bringing her inside for a couple of hours could help. But you may need to work with a vet or a trainer.
“Chewing and licking can disrupt the normal skin barrier and the normal skin defenses,” Dr. Pachel says. Dampness from saliva can lead to yeast and bacterial infections, particularly for dogs with thick fur that retains moisture. And repeated friction from a rough tongue can rub off fur and cause acute moist dermatitis (hot spots) and lick granulomas (skin lesions).

If you find your dog is bloodying his paws or otherwise hurting himself trying to escape the crate, another course of action needs to be taken. For cases of severe separation anxiety, an applied animal behavior or other behavior consultant should be employed. This serious problem will need an individualized behavior modification program and possibly drug therapy to be resolved.
A pharmacist in 1960 invented this famous product that should deter dogs from chewing up their itchy skin or any other surface. It is the strong bitter flavor that will discourage your dog from chewing your precious furniture. Simply spray the product on all the surfaces you wish to be left undisturbed. The spray is harmless and will not stain your furniture. It can be found in any major pet store. Curiously though, it appears that some dogs are not bothered by the flavor and some have been reported to even like it!
Dogs really like to dig. You'll have to train Fido to get him to stop. When you catch him in the act say "no." Then distract him with a toy. It won’t help to scold him after he's done. You need to be consistent when he’s digging, not afterward. Tip: Give him a sandbox where he can go to town. Bury some favorite toys and watch him have fun getting them out. Pile on the praise -- it will help him learn that he can dig all day in that spot.
Your dog may be a big chewer necessitating stronger chew toys. Invest in some “heavy duty” chew toys such as Nylabones or pretty durable rubber toys. Try to stay away from rawhide bones that may cause choking and even intestinal obstructions. Stay away as well from squeaky toys as many dogs have gone through the toy and ingested the squeaker requiring major surgery. Kongs are very durable and great as they may be stuffed with peanut butter or other goodies. They may also be frozen to relieve puppy’s teething pain. If you are not supplying the right chew toys that meets your dog’s chewing requirements he/she may easily find your furniture much more appealing. Try to make the toys more atrractive by routinely alternating them to prevent boredom.
Size Matters: An important warning about choosing the correct size toys for your dogs, including when you have multiple dogs of different sizes. This photo (inset) is an X-ray of a dog’s abdomen. The three snowman-shaped objects you see in the middle of the image are Kongs within the dog’s stomach! They wound up there, not because the dog’s owner intentionally gave their dog the wrong sized Kongs, but rather because their kiddo didn't supervise closely enough while this dog’s puppies were playing with their food-stuffed Kongs! Mom perhaps decided that her pups were having too much fun and wanted in on the action. Or, maybe it was as it so often is, the kids just left their mess laying around for mom to clean up … and clean up this mom did! She had to be taken to surgery to have these three Kong toys removed from her stomach. She’s doing well and lesson learned for everyone.
Some dogs bark at things others ignore. Some bark when they're frustrated. Don't yell at your dog when she barks. That could make it worse. Obedience training can help fix frustration barking. If your dog learns to sit before she does something fun like going for a walk, she’ll learn to control her impulses. If she’s outside all day, bringing her inside for a couple of hours could help. But you may need to work with a vet or a trainer.
It’s normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects as they explore the world. Chewing accomplishes a number of things for a dog. For young dogs, it’s a way to relieve pain that might be caused by incoming teeth. For older dogs, it’s nature’s way of keeping jaws strong and teeth clean. Chewing also combats boredom and can relieve mild anxiety or frustration.
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