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Dogs with environmental allergies may need to have daily allergy shots.  Dogs with flea allergies should be on monthly flea preventative medication. Corns may need to be surgically removed from the pads.  Foreign objects will be removed from the pad and bandaged. Secondary yeast infections are treated with topical antifungal medications.  Bacterial infections are treated with topical and oral antibiotics.  
To help, we've put together this 3-step guide so you can "chews" wisely (and safely). And, since no two dogs use a toy the exact same way (see “Chews-onality” section below), we’ve also included a few words of caution about the different types of chews and chew toys so you can best assess which types might be best for your dog and so you can know what to look out for if any problems arise.
Rope toys are generally safe for the right types of chewers. However, plenty of dogs have undergone surgery to remove strands of rope from their stomach or intestines. All “foreign body” digestive obstructions are dangerous (and distressing) for dogs, but the linear foreign body type that comes from strings that make up rope toys is particularly dangerous. That’s because linear foreign body obstructions can saw through a dog’s intestines with severe, painful, and expensive consequences. If you let your dog chew on a rope toy, never let them do so without observation, never leave it laying around, and always take it away if you see the dog pulling out and eating the strands.
There are many chews on the market today that can be considered safer for dogs because they are digestible and not too hard for teeth. It is important to remember that even large chunks from digestible chews can still cause GI upset or blockage. Always supervise your dog after giving it chews. If the dog seems to be swallowing large chunks, take the chew away. Furthermore, if the dog develops vomiting, diarrhea, or other signs of illness, see your vet right away.
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