There are many chews on the market today that can be considered safer for dogs because they are digestible and not too hard for teeth. It is important to remember that even large chunks from digestible chews can still cause GI upset or blockage. Always supervise your dog after giving it chews. If the dog seems to be swallowing large chunks, take the chew away. Furthermore, if the dog develops vomiting, diarrhea, or other signs of illness, see your vet right away.
A pharmacist in 1960 invented this famous product that should deter dogs from chewing up their itchy skin or any other surface. It is the strong bitter flavor that will discourage your dog from chewing your precious furniture. Simply spray the product on all the surfaces you wish to be left undisturbed. The spray is harmless and will not stain your furniture. It can be found in any major pet store. Curiously though, it appears that some dogs are not bothered by the flavor and some have been reported to even like it!
Puppy chewing is often caused by the fact that either their baby teeth are erupting, or they are being replaced by permanent teeth. The tiny, needle-like teeth erupt when your pooch is around 3 to 8 weeks old, and just when you get used to scratches from nipping, they start teething again. Dogs stop teething when they are around 4 to 6 months old when all of their milk teeth are replaced by adult ones.
My dog has been biting his foot for a couple years now. We used to treat it by giving him half of a children's Benadryl pill (vet recommended) but we stopped awhile back when it seemed to stop. Recently he's been biting his foot again but now it's all the time and he softly whines the whole time he's doing it. I think it's time we get him checked out, thoughts?
1. Rule out medical problems. The first step is to make sure that your puppy does not have any serious medical problems. Nutritional deficiencies caused by poor diet and/or intestinal parasitism can lead to pica which may be misconstrued as inappropriate chewing. Gastrointestinal problems may cause nausea which can trigger chewing as a coping mechanism. Therefore it is important to make an appointment with your veterinarian to rule out an underlying medical condition that may be causing or contributing to the dog chewing.
Obviously, the positive thing about digestible chews is their increased safety. However, the downside is that they don't last very long and tend to be more expensive than bones and hooves. To save money, try balancing between chew toys and edible chews. Aggressive chewers might do well with something like a food-filled Kong Ultra, bully sticks, beef tracheas, or flavored dental chews.
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